NASC push for apprentices raises money for charity

nascThe ?New Apprenticeship Challenge’ from the National Access and Scaffolding Confederation (NASC) is picking up momentum after Access Solutions Scaffolding joined the list of member companies sponsoring the charitable efforts of the event.

Aimed at creating 400 scaffolding apprentices over the current president’s two-year term, the challenge is now being sponsored by 11 NASC members who will help raise money for Teenage Cancer Trust. The companies are collectively donating œ110 for each new apprentice started by an NASC member up to the target number, potentially raising œ44,000 by the end of the challenge in November 2015.

Kevin Ward, president of NASC, will announce the scheme’s progress later this month at the confederation’s AGM in Manchester next month, one year on from its launch. It is hoped that apprentice numbers will be at or over the 200 mark, equating to more than œ22,000 raised for the Teenage Cancer Trust, to date, at the halfway point.

Mr Ward said: “I am delighted at the progress so far, in terms of new apprentices being taken on by our members. And I am looking forward to seeing what progress we have made at the halfway point of the initiative. However, regardless of any success in terms of numbers to date, I know there’s a long way to go before we can consider the challenge a success – so I want to encourage all NASC members to continue to recruit new scaffolding apprentices over the coming year.”

He added: “I am very grateful for the generous support and also delighted to welcome Access Solutions Scaffolding to the growing list of member companies sponsoring the charitable side of this challenge – which is a fantastic and very worthy cause indeed.”

Michelle Aucott, regional fundraising manager for Teenage Cancer Trust, West Midlands, said: “We are delighted to have the support of NASC and its sponsor members. The money raised from the New Apprentices Challenge will help support young people with cancer, so they don’t have to face their diagnosis alone.”

www.nasc.org.uk